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Where does the money go?
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Where does the money go?

Where does the money go?

Snowdrop are delighted to announce that of all income received during the last financial year, 70% was spent on direct care for our children and their families.

Approximately £350,000 is spent annually on direct family care, which includes paying the wages of our special Snowdrop Care at Home Team, as well as the urgent financial help that is given to parents.  Here are some of the ways that money has been spent in the past:

  • Help with Petrol bills for parents travelling thousands of miles to take their child to and from hospital, visiting children, attending outpatient appointments and therapies.
  • Taxi fares to Great Ormond Street Hospital, for a child to have a kidney transplant and for children to have bone marrow transplants (cost in excess of £160 round trip)
  • Most trips to hospitals are made with the help of Snowdrop Family Volunteers who drive families in their own cars and the charity pays their expenses.
  • Pushchairs for sick children when it is impossible for the family to fund them.
  • Computers/laptops to help children who have missed days, weeks and sometimes years of schooling. To communicate with family/friends whilst in isolation wards and to be "a window to the world" whilst being housebound.
  • Washing machines/dryers for incontinent and very ill children.
  • A Fridge for a family to store special food, medicines etc
  • Funeral costs.
  • All local funeral directors provide their service free for children under 16.
  • Helping with rent, electricity and other household bills which can soar when a child is ill.